Poland – The Land of Business Oppertunity


2000px-Kotwica_symbolPoland is a country with a strong cultural and economic background that has benefited with the post-communist economic liberalization. The political freedom seen in past few years has let the country in becoming the 22nd largest globally by GDP. With much of Europe still struggling to recuperate from the impact of the 2008 financial crisis, Poland stands out as a territory of economic success, a place where companies and individuals plan for growth rather than decline. The reasons are simple: a large internal economy, a business-friendly political class, and the dynamic potential of a developing country catching up with its global competitors.

The Past:

The secrets of Poland’s sustainability and resilience trace back to the post communist era, when its leaders pulled the country through a set of painful but ultimately effective reforms. In the 80s and the 90s Polish consumers had limited choice when it came to buying products. Mostly everything was developed by public sector organizations driven by stringent political reforms. These organizations had 30-year business plans which were based on political principles rather than market research or analysis. So the consumers had limited choices of products that did not met their demands or tastes.

The Change:

Since the collapse of communism in 1989, Polish economy has grown rapidly. On 1 May 2004, Poland joined the European Union and thus became a member of the vast European single market where goods, services, capital and labor move as freely as within one country. Another point to note is that during the recent global economic downturn Poland has been the only country in Europe to show growth in GDP.

The Future:

Economic restructuring, capital inflows, trade liberalization, privatization, and the gradual adaptation of legal and administrative standards to market oriented practices have improved economic structures dramatically. The Polish government has also streamlined the process for transferring property, made paying taxes easier, reduced the time required to enforce contracts, and strengthened the business liquidation process.

Also, a recent KPMG report shows that the Poles’ budget for spending is going up. For example: Poles spend 18% of their income on luxury goods, and aspirational Poles spend 13% on luxury goods. The total spend in Poland in 2012 on luxury goods was 36.8bn zloty (around £7.2bn), up by over 10% since 2011. This figure is expected to keep rising, hitting 46.4bn zloty by 2015.

Recent reforms in areas such as financial markets, company and competition law, accounting, and intellectual property rights have improved the environment for private business and boosted economic growth.

So for new businesses there is great news, as the country offers a range of business and industry options. Research suggests that Poland is ranked among the top 20 most attractive markets globally for retail brands. The fast developing tastes and stable economy mean that if retail is your business, Poland is a great country to target. Also, due to the modernization of healthcare in Poland, the pharmaceutical industry is likely to keep growing, making it a key focus for UKTI and UK exporters. So the Polish pharmaceutical market is another good bet. Finally, considering that the breadth of products needed is so diverse, the potential for selling and exporting there is huge.

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